Introduction to Video Editing with Adobe Premiere Pro

In this 3 hour, hands on workshop, participants will learn how to start a project, manage media and employ basic tools and strategies to edit like a pro. Well, almost. Here’s the rundown.

ICE BREAKER: Editing Sequence Exercise.

Sequencing ImageCC

Break into groups. Each group arranges the cards in any order to tell a visual story.

THE RESULT: Demonstrates that editing is the arrangement of images. The order you put the images in shapes the story you are telling. There are any number of ways to arrange the same images. FUN!

INTRODUCTION TO EDITING

Before you start consider…

  • What is the story you are trying to tell?
  • Who is your audience?
  • Think of flow, rhythm, tempo. Editing is like writing music.
  • Be prepared to “kill your darlings” – you will almost certainly need to cut away things you love for the sake of the bigger project.
  • Shorter/tighter is most often better
  1.   GET STARTED: Best practices for Creating a NEW PROJECT        

TIP: Be Organized

  • Create a New Folder on Desktop
  • Consolidate all media (footage, images, music, documents – use sub folders for each)
  • Open Premiere Pro – Create NEW PROJECT – confim “Scratch Disk” location
  • Use your Bins: Basics for Importing and organizing media (footage)
  • Creating a NEW SEQUENCE
  1.  GET CUTTING 

*TIP: Save Often

  • Basic project layout
  • Basic tools and functions – Where they are
    • Blade and Hand
    • Transitions
    • Effects
    • Titles

Get started

  • Bringing media into your TIMELINE
  • Understanding Video and Audio Tracks
  • Difference between selecting media from SOURCE or on the TIMELINE
  • Duplicate, duplicate duplicate
  1.   GET IT OUT THE DOOR
  •      Basics of Exporting (codecs, file types, compression, render queue, etc)
    • Quicktime, H.264-mp4

RESOURCES:

VIDEO: Common Examples of Cuts and Transitions

Premiere Pro editing Cheat Sheets: Premiere Pro Beginners Guide

 

OER: Educreations Video

For our Going Visual II workshop, we have created a video using the app Educreations. This is a really neat (free) app that allows you to draw on your iPad and record your voice at the same time. It’s a great way to make instructional videos quickly and efficiently. The app lets you edit your video, and draw with a variety of tools and colours. You can also upload images and draw on top of them.

 

Check out our video here:

How did we make it?

1. First, we planned out the idea quickly using a storyboard. You can of course make your video on Educreations by starting with the app itself, but we find it’s always easier to rough out our ideas first. Here is the one we used for our video:
educreations storyboard

2. We then fleshed that storyboard out with a script so that we’d know what to say.

3. Finally, we fired up the app. It took four takes of about 4 minutes each until we got something we liked.

4. Educreations stores the video on its servers and lets you embed the video or send out a link. We have embedded the link here on our blog with a quick cut and paste. And just like that we have an OER!

Interactive documents: using audio + visual together

After producing an audio file/”podcast” on how to read a type of university policy document called an “RRSDA” or records retention schedule, I distributed the audio to various folks and asked for feedback.

One frequent piece of feedback was that, for new users, it was simply too difficult to follow along without looking at a sample document. The audio alone was fine for people who have already seen policy documents of this type, but new folks needed to SEE and HEAR in order to figure out what I was talking about.

This led me to ThingLink, an educational tool that allows you to embed sound, video, and links into a static document to construct an interactive experience for the user. The result is below.

If this document is not interactive (i.e., nothing pops up as you mouse over the doc), access it instead on ThingLink.

Recording about records

OERs about records using  (archival) records

The purpose of this podcast is to teach records creators in SFU departments how to read the retention schedules of the university, which are multi-part policy documents called “RRSDAs“.

vinyl-308761_1280

The podcast is offered in a long version for new employees who have never seen an RRSDA. The podcast is structured into the 6 parts of the policy document, which is displayed alongside the audio so that listeners can visually follow along.

There is also a shorter version for frequent users who just need to a refresher. People tend to only use RRSDAs once or twice a year, and sometimes they just need a reminder of the basics.

Throughout the podcast, I give examples of how to apply RRSDAs to digital records, as well as analog ones.

The podcast uses SFU’s own archival records to provide the music and sound snippets, including the convocation music from 1969 and early radio marketing messages encouraging students to come to SFU. Early audio like this is permanently preserved in the archives, thanks to the departments who created it and used RRSDAs to transfer it to the archives.

https://soundcloud.com/sfu-rm-archives-joy/epi01-rrsda-long-version

https://soundcloud.com/sfu-rm-archives-joy/epi01-rrsda-quick-version

 

Mini teaching tool: How to handle photos in the archives

In the archives, we have thousands of photos that have been produced by SFU departments over the last 50 years, plus plenty of others that are parGIF files showing the proper way to handle archival photost of the records donated by faculty, campus community members or others.

Photographic prints are vulnerable to the oils on our hands, so we ask users to always wear gloves to provide a barrier between your hands and the prints.

The paper supports that images are printed on can also become vulnerable and fragile as they age, so we show users how to carefully turn one image at a time to protect the prints.

These images are part of the F-247 collection which contains material from the Media and Public Affairs Office of SFU.

Icon a go-go

In last weeks hands on workshop we asked our participants to do an “icon jam”, essentially a visual brainstorming activity, in which we collaboratively (and quickly) generate a series of icons based, and then share the results afterwords and discuss. This can be a challenge for those that have not had a lot of experience drawing, but I believe people come away with a better understanding of the subjective nature of visual language, and that ‘getting it right’ is not as important as making an impact.

Icon Jam 2015 Gallery

 

Icons will no doubt continue to play an important role in many of the educational media assets being created in our course, so I thought I would share a few extra online resources to help you find and make them, as well as a BONUS CHALLENGE you can use to practice your icon making skills.  But first.. some resources! Continue reading “Icon a go-go”

Street Interviews on the “Downtown Eastside Local Area Plan”

DTES Cover
What do different groups in the DTES think of the Local Area Plan? (click on image for video)

In March 2014, Vancouver City Council approved a $1-billion plan to redevelop the Downtown Eastside, covering a large area from Richards Street to Clark Drive (http://vancouver.ca/home-property-development/dtes-local-area-plan.aspx). This comprehensive initiative, titled the “Downtown Eastside Local Area Plan”, has created controversy among the public.

It is the purpose of this video to contribute to making sense of the opposing viewpoints on the project. Conducted in the Downtown Eastside, the interviews seek to demonstrate to the students of urban sociology that the city, and social space in general, is a site of contention between different classes and communities.

The video will be shown in class (SA 364 – Urban Communities and Cultures), which will be followed by a short writing exercise where the students will be asked to discuss what they have seen in relation to urban sociological themes and concepts.

Capturing the Urban Experience

Student Photoboard for SA 364 - Urban Communities and Cultures
Student Photo Board for SA 364 – Urban Communities and Cultures (click on image)

This is one of the graded assignments for my urban sociology class. Throughout the semester, each student is expected to submit two photos they take within the Greater Vancouver Area. Alongside the photo, they provide information as to how that image relates to some of the themes and concepts that are covered in class, and they ask a question that is later discussed as a group in the seminar.

The learning outcome here is to develop students’ sociological perspective on the various manifestations of city life. The photo board is expanding every day!

Physics Doodles: Video and GIF

I created a short “doodle” video and a GIF to use in my PHYS 102 Physics for the Life Sciences II class. This is an algebra-based first-year course for students studying life science majors such as Biology or BPK. The video explains Faraday Law’s of Electromagnetic Induction and the GIF illustrates Lenz’s Law which is related to Faraday’s Law. Students often find the concepts behind these laws confusing so I though that learning tools that they can look at over and over again might be helpful to them.

I placed the doodle video on YouTube. It can be found here: Physics Doodle: Faraday’s Law

This is the Lenz’s Law GIF:

LenzLaw