Case Academy for Students and Coaches

Case Academy is a curated group of tools and resources to help students learn how to analyze case studies and train for business case competitions.

I began by consulting a number of my former case competition students to find out what types of training content they found most beneficial. We brainstormed different categories for content. I also ran a keyword analysis on Google Adwords around related phrases to see what was being searched the most. Continue reading “Case Academy for Students and Coaches”

I can icon (towards a text/image remix assignment)

Just a fun little wordplay as I like to do some times, thinking about a potential new visual assignments for EdMedia practitioners.

Push-button-receive-baconWe do a lot of exploration in visual recording information in the Going Visual module, but our discussion last week got into some of the nuances involved in using text and image together. We always get a positive response on the “Icon Jam” activity, and I have wanted add to our assignment collection with the idea of “Remaking meaning” by adding new (and surprising) text to common and seemingly universal icons, signs and symbols. I was inspired by the above “Push Button Receive Bacon” meme and wondering how difficult it would be to come up with something like this yourself. Continue reading “I can icon (towards a text/image remix assignment)”

ETUG 2015: A Technologist’s edX Case Study

 

 

Last week at the ETUG conference here at SFU, I attended a talk, “A Technologist’s edX Case Study,” by Ian Linkletter (UBC).

exedcasestudy_etug2015

 

Drawing on his experience, Ian Linkletter gave us some great tips on how to get people to sign up to an online course, and to stay engaged, especially if it’s free.

One thing I really took away from this talk was in regards to deadlines. It is this: give your students a deadline for assignments that you know is not firm, and then, extend it! By showing the students that you are ready to be flexible allows them to buy in. He also recommended putting a countdown clock on the course website, which gives students a sense of urgency. In Ian’s example, 451 students had met the first deadline, and 721 met the second extended deadline. That’s quite a difference!

Check out my graphic notes for some more tips.

 

 

ETUG 2015: Creating Conditions for Well-Being in Learning Environments

At the ETUG conference this month, I attended a presentation by Alisa Stanton, Rosie Dahaliwal, and David Zandvliet (SFU) called “Creating Conditions for Well-Being in Learning Environments.”

I practiced visual note-taking during the talk, with the results below. In essence, the talk was about how instructors can get students to feel connected and at ease in the classroom environment. Because studies have found a very strong correlation between students’ levels of stress and their grades, health in the classroom environment is vital for students’ success. What I took away from this talk was that health in the classroom comes down to three essential parts:

  • sharing
  • understanding diversity
  • being heard/sense of empowerment

Health and Counseling Services at SFU also has a diagram that highlights their 10 conditions for well-being in learning environments, available as a PDF here. This document includes some simple tips for instructors on how to create these conditions within the classroom.

The talk was informative and important, as mental and physical well-being are the foundations for all learning!

graphicnotes_health_etug2015