Interactive documents: using audio + visual together

After producing an audio file/”podcast” on how to read a type of university policy document called an “RRSDA” or records retention schedule, I distributed the audio to various folks and asked for feedback.

One frequent piece of feedback was that, for new users, it was simply too difficult to follow along without looking at a sample document. The audio alone was fine for people who have already seen policy documents of this type, but new folks needed to SEE and HEAR in order to figure out what I was talking about.

This led me to ThingLink, an educational tool that allows you to embed sound, video, and links into a static document to construct an interactive experience for the user. The result is below.

If this document is not interactive (i.e., nothing pops up as you mouse over the doc), access it instead on ThingLink.

Recording about records

OERs about records using  (archival) records

The purpose of this podcast is to teach records creators in SFU departments how to read the retention schedules of the university, which are multi-part policy documents called “RRSDAs“.

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The podcast is offered in a long version for new employees who have never seen an RRSDA. The podcast is structured into the 6 parts of the policy document, which is displayed alongside the audio so that listeners can visually follow along.

There is also a shorter version for frequent users who just need to a refresher. People tend to only use RRSDAs once or twice a year, and sometimes they just need a reminder of the basics.

Throughout the podcast, I give examples of how to apply RRSDAs to digital records, as well as analog ones.

The podcast uses SFU’s own archival records to provide the music and sound snippets, including the convocation music from 1969 and early radio marketing messages encouraging students to come to SFU. Early audio like this is permanently preserved in the archives, thanks to the departments who created it and used RRSDAs to transfer it to the archives.

https://soundcloud.com/sfu-rm-archives-joy/epi01-rrsda-long-version

https://soundcloud.com/sfu-rm-archives-joy/epi01-rrsda-quick-version

 

Mini teaching tool: How to handle photos in the archives

In the archives, we have thousands of photos that have been produced by SFU departments over the last 50 years, plus plenty of others that are parGIF files showing the proper way to handle archival photost of the records donated by faculty, campus community members or others.

Photographic prints are vulnerable to the oils on our hands, so we ask users to always wear gloves to provide a barrier between your hands and the prints.

The paper supports that images are printed on can also become vulnerable and fragile as they age, so we show users how to carefully turn one image at a time to protect the prints.

These images are part of the F-247 collection which contains material from the Media and Public Affairs Office of SFU.

Embedding videos and images from OTsummit

Last week the 3rd annual open textbook summit was held in Vancouver B.C.  There was an amazing turn out and it was clear that this initiative is picking up steam, from various institutions including the BC and Alberta provincial governments, faculty and students. This is an eg. of how media elements (video and pics) can be “embedded” from external sites such as youtube and flickr.

There was a graphic recording on site to augment the keynote, it had an immediate as well as a delayed impact, by design.

This image was created on from amazing keynote from Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani titled “An openness to openness: The terrifying and liberating process of disrupting higher education”.

 

GIFS go BOOM!

GIF GIF

Welcome to the world of the animated GIF! One of the final tasks of our EMP program is to get our participants familiar with making and sharing media in the OPEN.  For us that means posting to the Open Educational Media site here!

The assignment as posted in Canvas was to create an animated GIF using Gifboom! and upload it as a post.  Sadly Gifboom! is no longer operational, but some alternatives have been provided in Canvas .

While this may prove to be a challenge, as a first step you may just want to comment on this post. If nothing else you can test that your account works! See you next week at the show ‘n tell!