Interactive documents: using audio + visual together

After producing an audio file/”podcast” on how to read a type of university policy document called an “RRSDA” or records retention schedule, I distributed the audio to various folks and asked for feedback.

One frequent piece of feedback was that, for new users, it was simply too difficult to follow along without looking at a sample document. The audio alone was fine for people who have already seen policy documents of this type, but new folks needed to SEE and HEAR in order to figure out what I was talking about.

This led me to ThingLink, an educational tool that allows you to embed sound, video, and links into a static document to construct an interactive experience for the user. The result is below.

If this document is not interactive (i.e., nothing pops up as you mouse over the doc), access it instead on ThingLink.

Recording about records

OERs about records using  (archival) records

The purpose of this podcast is to teach records creators in SFU departments how to read the retention schedules of the university, which are multi-part policy documents called “RRSDAs“.

vinyl-308761_1280

The podcast is offered in a long version for new employees who have never seen an RRSDA. The podcast is structured into the 6 parts of the policy document, which is displayed alongside the audio so that listeners can visually follow along.

There is also a shorter version for frequent users who just need to a refresher. People tend to only use RRSDAs once or twice a year, and sometimes they just need a reminder of the basics.

Throughout the podcast, I give examples of how to apply RRSDAs to digital records, as well as analog ones.

The podcast uses SFU’s own archival records to provide the music and sound snippets, including the convocation music from 1969 and early radio marketing messages encouraging students to come to SFU. Early audio like this is permanently preserved in the archives, thanks to the departments who created it and used RRSDAs to transfer it to the archives.

https://soundcloud.com/sfu-rm-archives-joy/epi01-rrsda-long-version

https://soundcloud.com/sfu-rm-archives-joy/epi01-rrsda-quick-version

 

Mini teaching tool: How to handle photos in the archives

In the archives, we have thousands of photos that have been produced by SFU departments over the last 50 years, plus plenty of others that are parGIF files showing the proper way to handle archival photost of the records donated by faculty, campus community members or others.

Photographic prints are vulnerable to the oils on our hands, so we ask users to always wear gloves to provide a barrier between your hands and the prints.

The paper supports that images are printed on can also become vulnerable and fragile as they age, so we show users how to carefully turn one image at a time to protect the prints.

These images are part of the F-247 collection which contains material from the Media and Public Affairs Office of SFU.

Embedding videos and images from OTsummit

Last week the 3rd annual open textbook summit was held in Vancouver B.C.  There was an amazing turn out and it was clear that this initiative is picking up steam, from various institutions including the BC and Alberta provincial governments, faculty and students. This is an eg. of how media elements (video and pics) can be “embedded” from external sites such as youtube and flickr.

There was a graphic recording on site to augment the keynote, it had an immediate as well as a delayed impact, by design.

This image was created on from amazing keynote from Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani titled “An openness to openness: The terrifying and liberating process of disrupting higher education”.

 

GIFS go BOOM!

GIF GIF

Welcome to the world of the animated GIF! One of the final tasks of our EMP program is to get our participants familiar with making and sharing media in the OPEN.  For us that means posting to the Open Educational Media site here!

The assignment as posted in Canvas was to create an animated GIF using Gifboom! and upload it as a post.  Sadly Gifboom! is no longer operational, but some alternatives have been provided in Canvas .

While this may prove to be a challenge, as a first step you may just want to comment on this post. If nothing else you can test that your account works! See you next week at the show ‘n tell!

 

A (PD) Masterclass with Velcro Ripper: Cinematic Activism

Scared Sacred by Velcrow Ripper, National Film Board of Canada

Velcro Ripper is one of Canada’s foremost activist documentary filmmakers. I say activist because Velcrow’s films are not dispassionate exercises in objectivity. Instead, he shapes  films around issues and situations he cares deeply about. Velcrow also places himself in his films as the passionate voice of the narrator. This is what affords him Activist credentials and allows his films to take on a personal and powerful tone. Velcrow forces us to see his subjects the way he does and to feel their stories the way he does.

Continue reading “A (PD) Masterclass with Velcro Ripper: Cinematic Activism”

Open Education Resources – Librarians, Leadership and Opportunity

opened-logo

BC Campus is hosting an important OER event on Oct. 27 for librarians interested in Open Educational Resources. Come check it out!

Monday Oct 27, 2014, Noon – 4 pm
Douglas College, New Westminster Campus
Aboriginal Gathering Place, Room 4650

BCcampus is pleased to sponsor a half day of professional development opportunity for librarians interested in the open education movement and Open Education Resources (OER).  This day will introduce librarians to how open education is changing post secondary education, how librarians are involved in these changes, and the role of librarians as leaders in OER innovation.  Join us for presentations and discussions that highlight how librarians support open education and OER initiatives and the opportunities for future collaborations.

Open Textbook Event @ SFU Library October 23

Coming up next month at the SFU Library, a special discussion on an innovative practice that is sure to impact the student learning experience, if not their pocketbooks as well.

Open Textbooks: New Models in Textbook Production

Invites you to

…In celebrating Open Access Week, SFU Library is delighted to bring together a range of perspectives on open textbooks. Students spend roughly $1,000 per year on textbooks, and are increasingly advocating for freely available textbooks. In this province, BCcampus has been overseeing the Open Textbook Project, which involves creating 40 open textbooks in a variety of disciplines, and many faculty members have started to adopt or adapt open textbooks for their courses. Join us for an interactive session featuring three speakers actively engaged in the production, adoption, and use of open textbooks. Bring your questions and comments to this open discussion.

As a common practice in the Edmedia team, we will be there to get the latest info.

Roadmap To Warp Drive

Eagleworks roadmap

Even NASA physicist and FTL (faster than light) warp drive development team leader Harold White uses infographics to articulate his projection of steps it takes to go from the lab to distant planets.

For more on this go here, and here. Roadmap to the STARRRRRZZZZZZZZZZZZZ!

Street Interviews on the “Downtown Eastside Local Area Plan”

DTES Cover
What do different groups in the DTES think of the Local Area Plan? (click on image for video)

In March 2014, Vancouver City Council approved a $1-billion plan to redevelop the Downtown Eastside, covering a large area from Richards Street to Clark Drive (http://vancouver.ca/home-property-development/dtes-local-area-plan.aspx). This comprehensive initiative, titled the “Downtown Eastside Local Area Plan”, has created controversy among the public.

It is the purpose of this video to contribute to making sense of the opposing viewpoints on the project. Conducted in the Downtown Eastside, the interviews seek to demonstrate to the students of urban sociology that the city, and social space in general, is a site of contention between different classes and communities.

The video will be shown in class (SA 364 – Urban Communities and Cultures), which will be followed by a short writing exercise where the students will be asked to discuss what they have seen in relation to urban sociological themes and concepts.