OER: Educreations Video

For our Going Visual II workshop, we have created a video using the app Educreations. This is a really neat (free) app that allows you to draw on your iPad and record your voice at the same time. It’s a great way to make instructional videos quickly and efficiently. The app lets you edit your video, and draw with a variety of tools and colours. You can also upload images and draw on top of them.

 

Check out our video here:

How did we make it?

1. First, we planned out the idea quickly using a storyboard. You can of course make your video on Educreations by starting with the app itself, but we find it’s always easier to rough out our ideas first. Here is the one we used for our video:
educreations storyboard

2. We then fleshed that storyboard out with a script so that we’d know what to say.

3. Finally, we fired up the app. It took four takes of about 4 minutes each until we got something we liked.

4. Educreations stores the video on its servers and lets you embed the video or send out a link. We have embedded the link here on our blog with a quick cut and paste. And just like that we have an OER!

Going Visual II – a new graphic studio session

GVII
Going Visual II – Studio session will build on skills acquired in previous workshop

With an overwhelmingly interest from SFU faculty to use visuals and drawing in their teaching activities, we are pleased to be offering Going Visual II, a studio session in February 2016.  This will be picking up where the first workshop left off, or in the case of past EdMedia program participants, building on the introductory work completed there.

This studio will include many opportunities to practice drawing  in a variety of media, tips on using new software and hardware (such as tablets and web based drawing tools) and real world demos from other faculty. We are devoting time in this studio to discuss and develop your specific projects and address the practical issues you are facing when going visual in your class!

Check out the registration page on the teaching centre website for dates and to sign up (coming soon).

 

ETUG 2015: Creating Conditions for Well-Being in Learning Environments

At the ETUG conference this month, I attended a presentation by Alisa Stanton, Rosie Dahaliwal, and David Zandvliet (SFU) called “Creating Conditions for Well-Being in Learning Environments.”

I practiced visual note-taking during the talk, with the results below. In essence, the talk was about how instructors can get students to feel connected and at ease in the classroom environment. Because studies have found a very strong correlation between students’ levels of stress and their grades, health in the classroom environment is vital for students’ success. What I took away from this talk was that health in the classroom comes down to three essential parts:

  • sharing
  • understanding diversity
  • being heard/sense of empowerment

Health and Counseling Services at SFU also has a diagram that highlights their 10 conditions for well-being in learning environments, available as a PDF here. This document includes some simple tips for instructors on how to create these conditions within the classroom.

The talk was informative and important, as mental and physical well-being are the foundations for all learning!

graphicnotes_health_etug2015

 

Make it BOLD

BoldMark_DullImpressions_04

An inspiring post with 50 inspirational quotes all done up with some amazingly creative uses of typography. It was hard to choose the one I wanted to share in this post but thinking back to our “Going Visual” workshop this past week, the admonition to “Keep it bold” rung the most true. These images were meant to give our workshop participants some inspiration as they are preparing to get an edmedia project started, but following the breadcrumbs I realized there were more treasure on this site to be had.

First there are a good collection of design assignments and tutorials and teaching materials covering the basics of graphic design, and some challenges to get you practicing your design skills. 2nd, the site is actually the brainchild of a design software called Canva, that provides tools and software for generating all kinds of design images such as posters, social media icons and web graphics. I havent fully explored this app, (although I’m downloading the ipad app right now! ) but look forward to seeing what it can do. A free and simple alternative to professional design software such as the Adobe Creative Suite.

Drawing and design on the ‘Youshow’

I’ve been following the Youshow faithfully these past weeks, and signed up my personal blog and started doing some of these crazy daily assignments.

This week was of particular interest because they were covering visual design, and drawing and had invited guest speak Nancy White to drop some science on them! I’ve been fortunate to participated in many learning experiences with Nancy over the years, and know she has a wealth of it to go around. In Brians words…

We asked Nancy to elaborate on the ideas of what design means visually as well as for organizations and projects, and come away with some new activities that are introduced in this week’s unit on It’s All By Design (link TBA).

As we have a our own “Going Visual” workshop running tomorrow and an upcoming session on using sound in the classroom, this is a perfect time for me to engage in the YouShow, and build up some of the resources on our session page. If you are interested in design and visual practices, please check out our workshop and the fabulous collection of design resources and activities brewing over at the youshow.

Lynda Barry Lesson Ideas

Screen Shot 2015-01-30 at 1.41.25 PMIn my free time, I’ve been making my way through Lynda Barry’s book, “Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor.”  Lynda Barry is an American cartoonist, author and educator who has become well known for her funny and densely packed visual stories. I’ve admired her work for a while, but I didn’t realize she also taught courses on creativity, the unconscious and writing. This book is a collection of her syllabi from her experiences teaching at the University of Wisconsin Madison. But it’s not just that. It’s also an exploration of the imagination and how it works to create art. The book chronicles some of her thoughts on the matter, and how she worked to push her students beyond the ordinary.

It’s engaging both in content and style. You might be inspired by her innovative lesson plans and writing exercises. You can buy it here.

 

Back of the Napkin Bio Activity

expo_goingvisual

 

The Back of the Napkin Bio is an activity that is part of our “Going Visual” workshop, in which participants learn to be better visualizers. This activity tends to be a favourite, so we are including the instruction sheets here, for your use.

This downloadable going visual handout (PDF) is an instruction guide for the activity, and the going visual tips handout (PDF) contains some hints that we give participants before the activity. We only go over these very briefly; the second half of the workshop is devoted to going into those concepts in depth.

Feel free to make use of these and enjoy!

Draw it out – Back of the napkin bio

Developing your graphic facilitation skills takes practice, but it’s fun and rewarding activity that can aid in communicating your ideas to others, or working together in groupwork of all kinds.

Learning Objective + Pre-Assessment:   1. Create representations of ideas, expressions, feelings, or concepts graphically 2. Find out background of each participant.  (music, drawing, photography, etc.)

<Display visual agenda… where are we headed?>

Activity

“Draw it out” Activity questions

This is a form of “Flipchart resume”, modified from “A Better Icebreaker” post. I have adapted it to suit our activity as the “Back of the Napkin Bio”. As a form of pre-assessment we are going to try and find out a bit more about each participant, and where they are going with their Educational Media, while at the same time practicing our visual communication skills.

Steps

1. Get into pairs

2. Divide page into 4 areas, one for each question 3 min “interview” with your partner, document your findings visually. (Leave room for the NAME)

3. Consider the “tips” Shantala has shared with you. Use these to guide your visualizations.

4. Conduct the interview

Interview questions

What creative outlets are you most familiar with, how do you like to express yourself?

What kinds of media are you most interested in embedding in your teaching?

What is (are) your main teaching challenge(s)?

Free Choice: Choose one final question to ask your interviewee

 

5. Switch and repeat.

6. Gather for critique

Modified from “A Better Icebreaker

Source: http://johnleskodotbiz.wordpress.com/2011/06/26/a-better-icebreaker/

Some tips

Use these tips to help guide your drawings.

 

Jen’s first blog post

Jens media asset storyboard
Jens media asset storyboard

At the end of each course section I produce a ppt presentation of the main points with a voice over narration. This is then processed with a twitter link and also sent to students by email. Students can then access this by IPhone, Ipod, IPad, PC, Mac, tablet, surface etc anywhere there is wifi. This is based on my observation that young people access information via hand helds rather than laptops and desktops.

 

Going visual

From the royalty free website of retro vector art. http://retrovectors.com/
From the royalty free website of retro vector art. http://retrovectors.com/

Welcome to session 4! “Going visual”, in which we will explore our creative side and explore in context what it means to be facilitate your classes using 2d visuals whether they be graphics, drawings or otherwise.

What kind of visuals do you use in your class? Are they online or face to face? Typically visual elements for course materials fall into the “asynchronous” category of media. That is they are pre-designed and created and embedded on your course website. Sometimes however visual elements are incorporated into the class “synchronously” or in real time.

Some examples

Continue reading “Going visual”